Biblical Theology: Genesis

by | Apr 9, 2024


We are kicking off our Bible Study or Biblical Theology series with the book of Genesis. Adrianna Anderson brings her expertise as a Bible scholar to help us look at Scripture to see God’s plan for diversity and ethnic harmony. There is so much in Scripture on this topic. Genesis is packed full of promises for the nations, as you will hear in this episode. Take up and read with us!

Episode Captions

Austin (00:00.933) Grace and peace, friends. Welcome back to United We Pray. Austin Souter back with you today, joined by a special guest. And I’m very excited to introduce you to Adriana Anderson, how are you? Adrianna Anderson (00:12.638) I’m doing good, how are you today Austin? Austin (00:15.485) I’m doing well. I’m really excited for this series. Friends, we’re trying to bring you some longer form content this year, and one of the things we’re doing is a series on biblical theology, and that’s why we’re excited to have Adriana with us. She’s a student of the Bible. I don’t know what else you want to share about your biography, but what we are going to be doing is going through the Bible, starting with Genesis today and looking at God’s plan for diversity and how that works with ethnicity and other categories. So planning to be in a whole lot of Bible this year. Adrianna Anderson (00:52.254) Yes, looking forward to it. Austin (00:55.517) Friends just one housekeeping note if you’re a regular listener and fan of the ministry fans of what we’re doing here at United We pray it helps us out if you review us on Apple or Spotify or wherever you get your podcast All right, what we want to do in this episode is look at how God’s plan for diversity is there from the beginning. It’s not something he reacts to. It’s not part of the fall. God is the creator of diversity. It’s his idea. And so as we look at Genesis, man, you and I were talking offline. We’ve been talking about this for weeks. And there’s just so much in Genesis that, friends, it might feel a little bit like drinking from a fire hose. And I’m sorry about that, kind of, Adrianna Anderson (01:34.871) Yeah. Phew. Austin (01:45.967) It’s our purpose today is not to exhaustively cover Genesis. That’s not possible in a podcast episode like this. What we want to do is sort of introduce some ideas and highlight some key texts and key doctrines. And what we’re going to do, we’re going to take one pass through the book and just look at a rough outline of what happens and who’s involved. And then we’re going to take another pass and draw out some of the key doctrines that we need to understand and sort of anchor us as we read not only Genesis but the rest of our Bibles. You ready? All right. So we start at the very beginning in Genesis 1. Genesis 1 and 2. What happens? Adrianna Anderson (02:17.162) I’m ready. Adrianna Anderson (02:26.293) Mm-hmm. Adrianna Anderson (02:29.442) So this, first of all, the book of Genesis is known as the book of beginnings. And for those that don’t know, we can just remind our listeners that most theologians agree that Moses is the author. And the book was probably written during the Exodus around the early 1400 BC period, and it was written to the Israelites. So that’s very important to kind of understand even before we jump into Genesis one through two. chapters really, they’re amazing. They give an opening about creation. It definitely addresses the issue of Amago Day, but basically God creates the world and He creates Adam and Eve and on the seventh day He rests. And you know the theme of Amago Day is touched on in this, in these chapters and one of the points that is hit is the diversity of male and female. So very good two chapters, very important to make sure we… read and understand those because that’s where the beginning starts. Austin (03:33.581) And we see in these first two chapters, I mean, this beautiful picture of humanity in harmony with each other and in harmony with God. And we get two chapters of that. And then it goes south. So what happens in Genesis 3? Adrianna Anderson (03:45.022) Yes. Adrianna Anderson (03:48.782) So Genesis 3 is one of the saddest chapters throughout the Bible, and there’s certainly others, but here we see the fall, so obviously this is post-creation and we have someone else that enters the scene besides God and Adam and Eve, so we have the serpent entering the scene. And just to read really quickly, Genesis 3.1, this is important to understand. Now the serpent was more crafty than any other beast of the field has made. So his entrance on the scene is really, really important. And, you know, obviously after he enters, he tempts Eve, who is presented with this, you know… this issue of are you going to listen to God or are you going to do what you want to do? And so Adam is there present with her. They take of the fruit, which doing nothing. They take and eat of the fruit and then they run and hide. And then all of a sudden God asks, where are you? And then you have this series of blame shifting that starts. And then you see a series of curses and punishments that are meted out by the Lord. And then finally man is ultimately Austin (04:42.297) doing nothing. Adrianna Anderson (05:03.924) out of this amazing garden that God has created for them from the beginning. And so lots of sad things, but all hope is not lost. Austin (05:12.865) All hope is not lost, but it keeps getting sadder. So we go from Genesis 3 to Genesis 4. And what do we see happening in Genesis 4? Adrianna Anderson (05:17.195) Yeah. Yeah. So Genesis 4, you know, we really see kind of a theme of diversity being corrupted and the corruption of man happening as a result of sin. So you see Adam and Eve, they end up having Cain and Abel as the first children from their marriage. Abel keeps the sheep and Cain works the ground. Both of them end up bringing offerings to the Lord. God rejects Cain’s offering and his anger ensues. Then there’s a dialogue between God and Cain. Then Cain and Abel talk and then he kills his brother which creates the first murder And so then you know God ends up putting a mark on Cain So all men know not to touch him, but just very sad how this whole cycle quickly approaches and how The depravity of man we’re starting to see the corruption ensue in the earth and You know as you just said sadly, it’s gonna get worse it gets better. Austin (06:23.921) I mean, it does, it keeps getting worse. And in Genesis five through seven, I mean, we just see humanity’s descent into moral chaos. And the Lord responds to that by taking drastic measures with the flood and saving a remnant through Noah. And then in Genesis eight, we get God engaging specially with Noah. What happens there? Adrianna Anderson (06:27.383) Yeah. Adrianna Anderson (06:51.906) So you have, obviously corruption has now filled the earth as a result of sin from the beginning, as we reference in chapters 1 to 2. Sin is so bad, you know, that God is angry with himself almost that he made man. And so he decides that he’s going to destroy the earth with the flood. And as a result of that, he finds one person on the face of the earth that has found favor in his eyes. And that’s Noah. And so as a result, God commands Noah to make an ark and he calls him to bring his family and the animals that are living. And like I said, we could go deep into all of that, but you can read that in the eighth chapter as well. But there’s two of each kind and then there’s different kinds of birds and things that he calls him to bring all of these into the ark. And while Noah is doing this, of course, people are mocking him because no one’s ever even heard of rain. It’s like rain, what’s rain? So this is an amazing account because we see where God, even in his righteous anger to do what he chooses to do with mankind, you still see his mercy. And as a result of that mercy, we have what’s called the Noahic covenant. So God actually enters into a covenant with Noah. And I’d love to just read from Genesis 8, chapter 8, verses 21. And I’m going to read through 22 and it just says, And when the Lord smelled the pleasing aroma. So this is God cutting covenant with Noah. The Lord said in his heart, I will never again curse the ground because of man. For the intention of man’s heart is evil from his youth. Neither will I ever again strike down every living creature as I have done. While the earth remains, see time and harvest cold and heat, summer and winter, day and night shall not cease. And then if you look at chapter 9 verses 8 through 17, this actually breaks down the entire parts of the Covenant and God basically is saying this is the sign I’m gonna put a rainbow in you know the heavens and this is my reminder that I’m never going to destroy man and demise them again and so you have a beautiful picture of in spite of Adrianna Anderson (09:20.18) is still using this one man to show his mercy in the earth. And so it’s just a beautiful picture of God’s grace. Austin (09:31.509) It is and used a phrase just a minute ago that I wanted to circle back on because I’m not sure all of our listeners will be familiar with it, but you talked about God cutting a covenant and this idea of covenant is so important to the entire Bible, but specifically the Old Testament. What is a covenant and how is it ratified? What what did you mean by cut a covenant? Adrianna Anderson (09:52.394) So God cut a covenant with… many people as we’re going to see as we walk throughout this book and basically that is God saying I swear by myself that these things will happen and I’m the only one that can fulfill these things and so that’s kind of what that term cutting a covenant means. It’s you know if you think about marriage when a husband and wife make a vow to one another they’re cutting covenant they’re saying Adrianna Anderson (10:24.976) So it’s very similar and certainly it’s much deeper because God is God and he is who he is and he is the only one alone that can keep the promises that he has made. And so that’s just kind of a glimpse of the cutting covenant. Austin (10:42.221) Yeah, and it’s so important and we’ll come back to it here in just a second with Abram, but Genesis 9 and 10 will come. We’ll circle back again on our second pass. But there is historically some terrible doctrine that has come from misinterpreting these passages and used as a justification for racism. So we’ll come back later and deal with what it doesn’t mean. But what does Genesis 9 and 10 mean? Adrianna Anderson (11:06.261) Yeah. Adrianna Anderson (11:11.082) Okay. Adrianna Anderson (11:14.782) So again, you know, Genesis 9, you have… You know, the curse of Ham is what has been taught. But basically in this chapter, you’ve got God blessing Noah with three sons. Noah plants a vineyard, he gets drunk, he lays uncovered. Ham, whose Canaan’s father sees his nakedness and tells his brothers about it, and then his brothers cover their father Noah. Noah awakes from his drunkenness and curses Canaan. And so that’s kind of what happens there. We’ll definitely go back and hit on some that as a result and I’ll kind of talk a little bit more about you know we’ll talk a little bit more about the curse and what it actually says and some other points there but then even in Genesis 10 you know you’ve got the table of nations so now you have the multiplication of diversity but in this chapter you really see a record of the genealogy of Noah after the flood and then one of the things that I love about Genesis chapter 10 is the beautiful language on the that the Lord uses referring to people. So you’ll see terms like clans, nations, languages, lands, and then from all of these nations humanity spreads abroad on the face of the earth and obviously this happens post-flood. So these chapters while oftentimes misunderstood and mistaught or erroneously taught, there’s just a beautiful picture of God’s diversity in here. Austin (12:47.241) And a couple things to highlight from that is the spreading of humanity throughout the Earth and these different nations or ethnos, as it’s translated later in the Greek, is a fulfillment of the Noaic covenant. It’s God answering his own requests, right? Adrianna Anderson (13:08.002) Yes. Austin (13:09.025) As you mentioned, like when God cuts a covenant, it’s different because he’s the one who ends up fulfilling it. And we, this Genesis 10 is an answer to that. So it’s hugely important. But again, it’s, it’s complicated because when we see humanity starting to both spread and then work together, we go straight into babble. I mean, my goodness. It’s what a mess. Adrianna Anderson (13:17.588) That’s right. Adrianna Anderson (13:24.575) Yes. Adrianna Anderson (13:34.903) Woo. Yeah, this is, you know, another to me, this is another beautiful chapter. Obviously, it’s, you know, about the Tower of Babel. But basically at this time, so as you go through after you hit Chapter 10, so now you’ve got the whole earth is using one language as they settle in a city called Shinar, sin is still present, obviously. But you hear it prevalently when the people in this passage are using terms like come, let us make and come, let us build. pride rising up in determining that they are going to do what they want to do. And that is not what God told them to do. He told them, if you read prior, to be fruitful and go fill and multiply the earth. And so here they are now trying to build this tower. And one verse in this passage that I love is when it talks about God coming down to see, and to see what they’re doing. And of course the Lord saw. But I just think that’s just amazing point that God is aware of, you know, all of the things that they were trying to do. I do want to just quickly read from Genesis 11 verses 6 through 9 and it says, and the Lord God said, behold they are one people and they have all one language and this is only the beginning of what they will do and nothing that they propose to do will now be impossible for them. us go down there and confuse their language so that they may not understand one another’s speech. So the Lord dispersed them from there over the face of all the earth and they left off building the city. Therefore its name was called Babel because there the Lord confused the language of all the earth and from there the Lord dispersed them over the face of all of the earth. And so, and I know we’ll come back and touch on that, but there’s very specific Adrianna Anderson (15:35.921) twisted and distorted that theologically as well. Austin (15:40.809) Yeah, and you’re right, we will come back to that and deal with it, but it’s so interesting just from a literary standpoint that Moses keeps zooming in and out, the scripture keeps zooming in and out. So we are right there with Noah and his family, and then we zoom out to the table of nations and we see humanity spreading, and I think it’s structured that way because it’s a direct answer to the Noahic covenant. But then we zoom back in on the Tower of Babel, And then we zoom back out to spread around, dispersed. And then right after that, we zoom way back in on one man and his little family. Who do we meet in Genesis 12? Adrianna Anderson (16:21.151) Yeah. So Abram, our brother Abram, so again according to history Abram is Terah’s son and he and his wife Sarai, because that’s her name at the time, are called by God to leave their country and we can read an account of that in Genesis 12. It’s in the first three verses but God calls Abraham when he’s 75 years old and tells him to leave Haran and go to a place that he will show him. So again even asked by God to walk by faith and just go. And then Abram is obedient and he does it. And so it’s amazing to see this couple and how God is going to use them throughout the course of history, really. Austin (17:11.621) And it’s right there in Genesis 12 in the call. He promises, God promises to take Abram to a land. And in this promise is verse three, I will curse anyone who treats you with contempt and all peoples on earth will be blessed through you. So this is just we’re learning about the character of God early in this book, right? About when God… calls someone he has a bigger plan in mind. And this plan for Abram involves all peoples, all nations. So we’ve just been seeing the nation spread and the mess that humanity is, and somehow the answer to this is in this little family. It’s just so, so moving. Adrianna Anderson (17:44.599) Yes. Adrianna Anderson (17:48.766) Yes. Adrianna Anderson (17:58.494) Yeah. Austin (18:02.485) So we get some life details about Abram. We see that he’s kind of a mess in the chapters following. His family’s a mess. And then we get to Genesis 15, where this promise is codified into covenant. What’s the significance of that? What happens? Adrianna Anderson (18:20.339) Yes. So, you know, again, another beautiful picture, just as we just kind of talked previously about the Noayic Covenant. So we have now in 15, God is speaking to Abram in a vision. There’s a dialogue between them about him having no heir to fulfill this promise. And so God actually, which I think is amazing, gives Abram the promise that he’s going to live to a good old age. And so then God, again, cuts a covenant with Abram. through 21 of Genesis 15 we have an account of that and I’d be happy to read that just because there’s some it’s a beautiful picture. So when the sun had gone down and it was dark the whole the smoking fire pot and a flaming torch passed between these pieces on that day the Lord made a covenant with Abram saying to your offspring I give this land from the river of Egypt to the great river the river Euphrates the land of the Kenites the Kenizites the Austin (18:57.209) Yeah, please. Adrianna Anderson (19:23.529) the Amorites, the Canaanites, the Girgashites, and the Jebusites. And so God is saying, I’m going to give you all of this and more. And we learn that as we continue to read about the life of Abraham and this covenant that God makes with him. But again, we see God’s goodness, his love, his kindness, that he still reaches out to humanity for the sake of his name. For the sake of his name. Austin (19:53.681) and we get more details about the covenant. We get the covenant sign. We get angels from the Lord visiting Abram’s family. And then we get just more details of his life. I mean the book spends a fair amount of time on Abram, Abraham and his family. But then Abraham dies and we see the covenant reaffirmed to his son Isaac. It’s it’s Adrianna Anderson (19:58.3) Mm-hmm. Adrianna Anderson (20:12.151) Yeah. Adrianna Anderson (20:16.248) Hmm? Adrianna Anderson (20:20.8) Yes. Austin (20:21.345) it didn’t end with Abram. It’s God is God is still working. So then we get Isaac’s family. Jacob and Esau. I mean the people of God are in the land. They’re having trouble with the nations. They’re having trouble with each other and the whole thing feels a little bit chaotic, but God is faithful and God is still working. Adrianna Anderson (20:26.495) Yeah. Austin (20:44.973) And then we get to Genesis 37 and we meet sort of the next most important character in the book. Adrianna Anderson (20:53.38) yes Joseph oh my goodness one of my favorite Austin (20:56.441) Talk to me about Joseph. Adrianna Anderson (21:01.046) Brothers, I always say he’s my brother, all my brothers in Christ, but just an amazing life. You know, Joseph walked through a lot, but just to kind of give some context and history. So Joseph, for those of you that do not know, Joseph is Jacob’s favorite son. And Jacob ends up making his son Joseph this coat of many colors, and then his brothers end up hating him and becoming jealous of him. After Joseph shares this dream to rule over them and then they end up plotting to kill him but because of one of the brothers Reuben they instead end up selling him into slavery and then the Midianites sell Joseph to the Ishmaelites for 20 shekels of silver and so if you’re familiar with the New Testament that 20 shekels of silver definitely has some good symbolism to what Judas did to Jesus and when he sold book as you look at Genesis 37 basically to 50 which is the end of the chapter. So after this happens we almost have like a pause for a station break and then you have this break of this recap of Judah. So we kind of jump back to Judah who’s Leah’s son for those that don’t know. So his wife dies or his wife dies he goes to Timnah to shear sheep and he sees this woman who he thinks is a Austin (22:11.566) Yeah. Adrianna Anderson (22:30.8) and he doesn’t realize that it’s actually his daughter-in-law because her face was veiled. And so he is basically approaching her to be intimate with her. And she says, well, before that happens, we need to make a pledge. And so she tells him, you need to give me your signet ring, your cord and your staff. And so obviously they have they become intimate. And then she ends up conceiving and bearing twins. And then ultimately, it’s revealed that Judah is the father. And so you kind of walk through that. And then it’s like we jump back to Joseph. You have the incident of Joseph and Potiphar’s wife, where there’s, you know, this her approaching him. The Bible talks about Joseph being a handsome man. And so she’s approaching him. He flees temptation like he should because he fears God more than he does. Potiphar’s wife. And obviously, Potiphar was the one that was in command during this time. Joseph ends up having to interpret some dreams for there’s two different prisoners. He ends up Austin (23:40.281) Cause he’s thrown in prison. Adrianna Anderson (23:42.022) Yes, because he’s thrown in prison for this act against the lie that Potiphar’s wife told. And so as a result, yes, he is thrown into prison. And so while he’s in prison… He is approached by two different prisoners. They tell him about these dreams that he’s had. He ends up being able to interpret them because God gives him the ability to do that. They make a promise to him that when they get out, they’re going to basically kind of give Joseph a good report so that he can get out of jail. Joseph actually asked them, remember me, and they don’t. And so Joseph then ends up having to interpret dreams that Pharaoh has and so this one of the prisoners one of the visions that or the interpretations that Joseph gave to one of the prisoners came true and he was actually murdered and then the other one ends up being the cupbearer to Pharaoh. And so he says, oh, I know somebody that can interpret this dream for you. And so that’s when he remembers Joseph. And so Joseph is called to interpret Pharaoh’s dream. And as a result of it, Joseph ends up rising to power at the age of 30. And so after that, you shortly you have. based on the interpretation of these dreams that Pharaoh has, there’s going to be seven years of famine and seven years of surplus. And so famine strikes, Joseph’s brothers end up going to Egypt to get grain. Joseph ends up, because he has not yet revealed who he is to, you know, to his brothers, he ends up… Adrianna Anderson (25:28.274) doing a test for them and they end up finding this cup in Benjamin’s sack. He eventually reveals his identity, brings his family to Egypt and they end up reuniting with Jacob, his dad. Jacob ends up blessing Joseph’s sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, because obviously he’s much older in age now. Then Jacob goes through this blessing with his own sons and then he ends up dying at the age of 147. Joseph ends up burying Jacob and all of Egypt mourns because of the position that Joseph holds. You know, he’s held in high esteem now. And so Joseph’s brothers still are afraid of him and they fear him. And if you look at Genesis 50, chapter 50, so we’re now about close to closing out the book, you’ll see in verses 15 to 21, I’d love to read that. And I love the subheading of this section because it’s called God’s Good Purposes. And I think that’s a great reminder for all of us. But it says, when Joseph’s brothers saw that their father was dead, they said, it may be that Joseph will hate us and pay us back for all the evil that we did to him. So they sent a message to Joseph saying, your father gave this command before he died. Say to Joseph, Please forgive the transgression of your brothers and their sin because they did evil to you. And now please forgive the transgression of the servants of the God of your father. Joseph wept when they spoke to him. His brothers also came and fell down before him and said, Behold we are your servants. But Joseph said to them, Do not fear, for am I in the place of God? As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good to bring it about as they are today. So do not fear. I will provide for you and your little ones. Thus he comforted them and spoke kindly to them.” And then Joseph ends up dying at the age of 100 and so God gave him such an amazing life and it’s just incredible, an incredible story, an incredible, you know, you’ve heard, maybe you’ve heard people say Joseph went from the prison to the palace and that is true. That’s exactly what happened. But one of the things that I love about Adrianna Anderson (27:49.04) is there’s nothing negative really said about him and his life and so even that is the grace of God because certainly Joseph wasn’t you know put in a place where he you know wasn’t tempted by sin because obviously he was but he made choices that honored God and so as a result the Lord really honored him even in how his life ended. Austin (27:53.072) Yeah. Austin (28:15.717) But like Abram, the- blessing of Joseph was a blessing to other people as well. So he rises in position and prominence in Egypt based on his knowledge and interpretation of dreams, which is a gift from the Lord, and he acts prudently to store up food for the coming famine. And then he is able to provide for Egypt as a result of this and even outsiders, sojourners who come down. And so the book ends with the family of God, this family of promise. Adrianna Anderson (28:22.032) Yes. Adrianna Anderson (28:30.231) Right? Adrianna Anderson (28:35.374) Mm-hmm. Adrianna Anderson (28:43.746) That’s right. Austin (28:48.581) in not the promised land, in Egypt together. And that sets up the stage for the Exodus, which is our next episode. Adrianna Anderson (28:51.614) Right. Yes. Adrianna Anderson (28:58.326) bright. Austin (29:01.585) All right, that’s the book. Let’s go back. That’s the book in 28 minutes. Thank you for that summary. That was excellent and very helpful. Now I want us to go back and look at some of the things we learn from this book because the narrative is also just pregnant with doctrine and meaning and. Adrianna Anderson (29:04.562) That’s the book. Woo! That’s right. Adrianna Anderson (29:22.336) Okay. Austin (29:26.961) theology, things about us, things about God. So let’s go back to Genesis 1 and 2 and talk about the Imago Dei. You used that phrase earlier. What does that Latin phrase mean? Adrianna Anderson (29:30.519) Right. Adrianna Anderson (29:35.182) Okay. Adrianna Anderson (29:38.398) So it basically means made in the image of God or in the image of God. And we know that God is spirit, but he obviously has, we don’t have all of his qualities and traits, but we are made in his image. So we have a physical being, we have spirit and we have soul. And so this is a term that if misunderstood results in many of the things that we saw as we just walked through the book. We saw murder, we saw lies, we saw deception, we saw evil, hatred, so many different things as a result of sin. But I really believe that as a result of sin, This is one of the reasons why we don’t value each other as human beings. And so this is an important concept to understand, that every human being that walks the face of the earth is made in God’s image, and we should therefore treat them with the utmost respect and regard. Austin (30:47.085) And we see this title applied to both Adam and Eve. It’s not like Adam was created in the image of God and then Eve was created in the image of Adam. Both are said to be of equal dignity before God. And we get to this in the Noaic covenant that even like the purpose of human government and institutions is to protect human life because it is of more value than anything else on this earth. And Adrianna Anderson (30:58.199) Yes. Adrianna Anderson (31:10.935) Yes. Austin (31:13.345) I’ve been thinking a lot about this. This isn’t the point of our episode, but just as a quick aside, that language and the idea of the image of God is baked into our national consciousness. Like it’s part of our founding documents as a nation as the cornerstone of human dignity. And obviously we’ve applied that imperfectly and hypocritically, but even that language, you know, pinned by A hypocritical slave owner in the 1700s came back around in the abolitionist movement and then again in the civil rights movement as like, this is who we say we are, this is what we say we believe. And it’s really served us well as a society and I worry for us if we lose that, we lose a lot else that we’re not prepared to. So I’m sorry. Forgive the aside. Adrianna Anderson (31:51.596) Right. Adrianna Anderson (32:04.414) Yeah. No, no, that’s okay. Austin (32:11.725) All right, so we’ve got Imago Dei in Genesis 1 and 2, people made in the image of God. Genesis 3 is also just really important to understanding our world around us. What doctrines do we draw out of Genesis 3 in the fall? Adrianna Anderson (32:29.714) So, oh goodness, there’s a lot in Genesis 3. So obviously, you know, we talked about this is post-creation. You have the serpent who has beguiled Eve or deceived her. And I always argue that it was her and Adam that were deceived. And so, you know, as you look through this book, you see so many different principles, theological implications, you know, Adrianna Anderson (33:00.728) They disobey him. They run and hide from God. You know, God is asking that question, you know, where are you? Who told you that you were naked? You know, once they reveal, as if God didn’t already know. And so, then of course, you know, we talked a little bit about kind of the blame shifting. And then God meeting out, Austin (33:11.871) Mm-hmm. Adrianna Anderson (33:21.45) curses and punishments for disobedience and you know ultimately we are called to be obedient to what God tells us to do because we are made in his image and you know the severity of the consequences of when we don’t and the severity of the consequences of When we don’t listen to the Lord and we listen to the evil one and so you see all of this You know humanity has begun to be marred and as a result You know, they were just driven out of the garden and the break in the separation of that intimacy that they held with the Lord is Heartbreaking, you know when you see the effects and the results of that and then he has to place the angel You know outside of the Garden of Eden, you know with these flaming swords to keep them out You know every time I’ve read those passages I weep because I think not only how must Adam and Eve have felt Austin (34:02.074) Yeah. Adrianna Anderson (34:21.484) himself feel for having to do that to him, you know, to his creation and so there’s just a lot to process in that chapter. Austin (34:30.053) There is, and Adam and Eve are in that relationship with God, as you said, in the garden in the prior two chapters. And they’re given a mandate. They’re not just hanging out. They have work to do. And then with the curses of Genesis 3, they’re still called to work. But work is now frustrated. And there is, as we see in the following chapters, relational discord. There is sickness. There is death. And so. Adrianna Anderson (34:38.51) Mm-hmm, right. Mm-hmm. Adrianna Anderson (34:46.636) Yep. Yes. Adrianna Anderson (34:53.485) Mm-hmm. Yes. Austin (34:57.385) We can’t understand the world as it is today without understanding Genesis 3. Adrianna Anderson (35:01.15) Right, yeah. Even in childbirth, you know, the pain of that women have to endure for that. And so, yeah, so many implications for that one choice that was made. Austin (35:14.157) And then we see it affecting diversity in the chapters following. So Cain and Abel are clearly different from each other. And that difference should have been a good thing, was a good thing, should have been perceived as a good thing. But Cain takes that difference as threatening and kills his brother. Adrianna Anderson (35:28.023) Mm-hmm. Adrianna Anderson (35:34.925) Yeah. Austin (35:35.169) And so we see like, and in the chapters that follow, we see diversity is still present, but instead of being it’s God intended blessing, we just keep finding new reasons to hate each other. Adrianna Anderson (35:47.659) Yeah. So sad and so true and it has this one principle has certainly permeated throughout society. And to your point, Austin, we find reasons to not like people just because they dress differently than we do or they look differently, obviously, which is the most obvious that we have failed to just honor people for who they are. And you have to, you would be remiss if you did not go back and understand why that is. why we’re still dealing with these issues today is because of the beginning. What happened in the beginning still affects humanity today. Austin (36:30.201) Yeah, amen. It’s sobering. So we talked about the Noayic Covenant. Let’s circle back on the curse of ham. And if you don’t mind, just share sort of what that historically has been used to teach and the things that has been used to justify. as sort of an application of what we were just saying. Folks look for any reason to mistreat each other and in our wickedness we can twist scripture to justify that. So we see that happening here in Genesis 9 or the use of Genesis 9 throughout church history. Adrianna Anderson (37:04.255) Yeah. Adrianna Anderson (37:08.639) Right. You know, again, this is, you know, obviously there’s the blessing of, you know, God blessing Noah with his three sons. But even in this man that God has chosen, he’s still human and he is still sinful. And so you see kind of what happens with him getting drunk. You know, he makes a statement and he ends up cursing his son. He ends up cursing Canaan, who is actually his grandson. understand the history, but erroneous teaching has really existed for years on this statement. And it’s so sad because, you know, again, speaking as an African American woman, this particular statement, you know, as you do your study on lineage and ethnicities, you know, ham, typically people from African American descent come from the lineage of ham is what us and so sadly the black people have been harmed by this erroneous teaching. I remember hearing specifically pastors speak in their pulpits and use this although it does not say anywhere that there it doesn’t say curse be ham it says curse be canaan and so you know it’s hard to understand how you can take how you can misconstrue scripture and take Austin (38:28.922) Right. Adrianna Anderson (38:39.448) and even change what the verse says for whatever your own reasons are. But anyway, as a result, African Americans have been harmed by this. And I would dare to say people of other cultures have been harmed by this because if you have a pastor in a pulpit teaching that the curse of Ham means that all people that are of African American descent are evil They are cursed and you can own them. You can treat them however you want. This is horrifying to God. And I do use a term exactly as I stated it. It’s a horrifying teaching. It is an egregious sin to miss teach and misquote this passage because so many people have been harmed by it. Austin (39:37.549) And we had a pastor named Chris Davis write a series on the so-called curse of ham. We will link to that in the show notes if you’re interested in further study. I found his articles really helpful. So thank you for explaining that. I wanted to circle back on Abram and Abraham. Same person at different points because I wanted to think about this idea of what it means that all nations on earth will be blessed through him. Adrianna Anderson (40:05.326) Mmm. Yeah, again, a beautiful promise that God makes. You know, so obviously we know that the Israel, the nation of Israel is God’s chosen people. But even in that, God does not forget about humanity, whom He has created in His image. And so you see that lived out in this covenant with Abram. You see that God has made a way or a means to provide for all people. And that’s all ethnicities, all all tribes, all tongues, all languages, as we end up seeing that same description in the Book of Revelation. Every tongue, tribe, and nation will be before the Lord on that day. And so it is a beautiful picture of diversity and God remembering his covenants that he made with Abram to bless all peoples of the earth. Austin (41:05.953) And Galatians obviously teaches us that this promised blessing was the Lord Jesus. And we see all kinds of illusions, even in the life of Abraham and Isaac, how Abraham is called to sacrifice his promised son, and then the Lord provides a substitute. I mean, it’s just, it’s all over the place how this points to Jesus. Adrianna Anderson (41:11.742) Yes. Adrianna Anderson (41:27.87) Yes. Yeah. Austin (41:29.829) And it’s just wonderful. And then we get to Joseph. And I was this is this is not canon. But I was listening to the late Dr. Sproul teaching on the life of Joseph. And he says that more than any other Old Testament figure, Joseph prefigures Christ in the way that he is righteous and stands up to temptation and suffers unjustly yet forgives. Adrianna Anderson (41:48.198) Yes. Adrianna Anderson (41:54.986) Yeah. Austin (41:56.841) and how through him so many other people are blessed. And there’s so much we could look at there, but I wanted to just mention how Genesis teaches us the doctrine of providence through the life of Joseph, even that he’s able to say, you meant it for evil, but there was a higher, truer actor who is orchestrating this for the good, not only of me, but of many people. That many would be kept alive even as they are today, right? Adrianna Anderson (42:01.14) Yes. Adrianna Anderson (42:13.922) Yes. Adrianna Anderson (42:22.466) That’s right. That’s right, absolutely. As a result of Joseph’s obedience, in spite of how he was treated, so reminiscent of the life of Christ, he was mistreated, he was mocked, he was, all of the things that he did, yet he still trusted in God’s plan for his life. And ultimately, as a result, we are the beneficiaries of that, which again, fulfills that Abrahamic covenant as well. Austin (42:35.856) Yes. Austin (42:51.15) Yeah. Austin (42:55.309) Yeah, I love this book. I love this book. So let’s just wrap it up and end. The family of God, this family of promise is in Egypt. They’re safe, they survive this great famine, and they are treated with high regard in Egypt for the sake of Joseph, who has saved Egypt from the famine as well. And it’s so striking that Adrianna Anderson (42:58.608) Hmm. Me too. Austin (43:25.141) Exodus begins with the death of Joseph. And yeah, I don’t wanna get too far ahead, but it’s, the stage is set. Adrianna Anderson (43:35.006) Right. Yes it is. It certainly is. Oh, read Genesis. Read Genesis. Live in the book. The gospel is woven all throughout it. Absolutely. Austin (43:43.877) Read Genesis, y’all. Austin (43:48.801) It’s so good. Well sister, thank you so much for this time. It’s it’s packed. It’s just in there. Why don’t we close this out in prayer in just thanking God for his word for his faithfulness and praying that our listeners would be people of the book. Adrianna Anderson (43:57.229) Yeah. Austin (44:13.003) Why don’t I start us and you can close us? Adrianna Anderson (44:15.374) Sounds great. Austin (44:18.825) Heavenly Father, thank you so much for your word. Thank you for all that it teaches about us and how we can understand ourselves and understand the world around us. Thank you for what you reveal about yourself and your good character and your good providence and rule of the world. Thank you for your faithfulness to your people through all generations. Thank you for Genesis and just how you show yourself to be a good father to them and to us. And most of all, thank you for Jesus and for promising him as the answer to our sin and then providing. In his name we pray, amen. Adrianna Anderson (44:58.414) Father, thank you so much for this amazing story you’ve given us. It’s one of hope, redemption, reminders of your goodness and your faithfulness. And Lord, most importantly, I pray that as these listeners read through this book, that you by your spirit would speak to their hearts and minds and remind them that because of your great love and your faithfulness, you have made a way for them through your son, Jesus Christ, who is our Lord. We thank you for this time. In your name we pray, amen. Austin (45:32.981) Amen. Friends, thank you so much for listening. Adriana, thank you so much for being on. And listeners, you can look forward to more of these. We are going to be walking through the rest of the Old Testament together. So keep listening and bring your Bibles. Grace and peace. Adrianna Anderson (45:47.443) Amen.

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  • United? We Pray

    United? We Pray is a ministry to help Christians pray and think about racial strife. We want to encourage Christians amid the strife to rely upon God in prayer. So our prayers can be informed, we strive to learn and write about race, racism and its effects, and theology. We aim to be biblical, beneficial, and clear in all our efforts. While we’re burdened for all racial strife, we focus on racial strife between Christians because of the unique privilege and stewardship God has given his people: to bear witness to Him and to love all people, especially one another (Gal. 6:10).

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